Three Things to Know about Buying a Foreclosed or Bank-Owned Property

Posted on: 24 October 2018

With the price of residential real estate continuing its rapid rise across the United States, many would-be homeowners are looking at short sales, foreclosures, or bank-owned properties to gain a foothold in the market without going over budget. However, the process of buying these properties—and the types of warranties you receive when purchasing a bank-owned property—can be very different than purchasing a home from an individual owner. Read on for three things you'll need to know before you put in an offer on a foreclosed or bank-owned (REO) property.
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Be Ready For These Defensive Legal Actions After A Car Accident

Posted on: 10 August 2018

There is usually a lot more to a personal injury case than just filing a lawsuit, and it might help you to understand what may happen. The filing of the lawsuit against the at-fault party is just the beginning in a chain of events that will, hopefully, lead to adequate compensation for you, the victim. Read on so that you will know more about this process. Once you file the suit, the other side will be served 
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Three Reasons That You May Not Want Your Job Back After Wrongful Termination

Posted on: 10 August 2018

When you hire an attorney to oversee your wrongful termination case and he or she indicates that your case is strong, the attorney will commonly ask you what outcome you want. There are all sorts of desired outcomes to consider in this scenario, including getting your old job back. Being rehired is something that many people want after a wrongful dismissal, especially if they enjoyed their old job, were good at it, and worked hard to get it.
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Understanding Duty Of Care In A Personal Injury Context

Posted on: 11 July 2018

If you are researching personal injury laws, then it's possible that you have come across the term "duty of care." Like other legal terms or theories, there is more to this phrase other than the literal meaning you may derive from such the phrase. What Is Duty of Care? The U.S. government expects you to behave in a manner that doesn't cause injuries to other people or damages to other people's properties.
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